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Longest Day Night Walk

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TEASSES GARDENS

LONGEST DAY

NIGHT WALK

 

Join the Head Gardener on a peaceful walk around the gardens at Teasses on the Summer Solstice followed by light refreshments in the Greenhouse. 

An opportunity to experience the Gardens “after hours” and the chance to spot some of our wild inhabitants on the longest day.

Walk starts at 8.30pm on Friday 21st June

£10 per person 

Contact [email protected] to reserve

Limited numbers available 

June in the Garden

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What a startling difference the beginning of June this year to that of 2018. The rain seems to be making up for lost droplets. In June 2018 we were facing the very real danger of a summer of drought. In 2019 we appear to be resorting back to old ways, the lawns could almost be cut twice a week at this rate. However, the cool evenings and high moisture has encouraged a great number of flowers to linger on. Our Rhododendrons continue to look fresh and have done for a month or so and we still have a few bluebells showing through the ever thickening wild grasses and flowers in Millennium Woods.

The Walled Garden continues to develop and the newly planted borders are beginning to really show their true intentions. It is quite startling to see bright reds and oranges in the garden where before we limited plant choice to cool pastel blues and pinks. Lewis’ long border design sets out bold blocks of colour, six in total; Yellow, Orange and Red blocks on the western side of the garden and Purple, Pink and Blue on the eastern side. Iris ‘Feu du Ciel’ is a welcome newcomer; bright orange and voluptuous. I am a lover of Irises and this one really justifies that. In front of this we have Geum ‘Prinses Juliana’ again vibrantly orange.

What a contrast then to the purple block where the ever delightful Thalictrum delavayi and Salvia x superba are neighboured by Geranium x ‘Johnson’s Blue‘, Nepeta x faassenii ‘Walker’s Low’ and Cirsium rivulare ‘Trevor’s Blue Wonder’.

The Paeonias are just about to open, holding onto their petals tightly awaiting sunnier weather no doubt, but Paeonia ‘Black Panther’ is a tree peony and has to have what I can only describe and the most indulgent dark – almost bloody – silky petals and has been in flower for around a week.

Throughout the garden many plants are in full bloom and none are more spectacular than the Meconopsis which grow incredibly well at Teasses. Meconopsis  betonicifolia are happiest when in cool, rich, deep woodland soils, happy roots lead to stunning azure blue flowers or in the case of M. paniculata primrose yellow. 

Davidia involucrata var. Vilmoriniana is a stunning tree, with branches covered in what looks like paper tissues. This tree has spectacular autumn foliage colour but every third year at Teasses we are treated to what appears like hundreds of white papery bracts hanging from the tree.  Ours is underplanted with Primula japonica ‘Miller’s Crimson’, what a combination.

In Sir Fraser’s garden, which occupies a hollow in a conifer plantation the clotted cream flower buds of Magnolia wilsonii are just beginning to burst open. They are ideally suited to this cool semi-shaded space in the garden and planted on a steep slope allowing visitors to gaze up from below at the interior of the flower which cannot be missed.

May in the Garden

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The garden is always the best place to be in the month of May, the sun usually is beaming down and the vibrant fleshy shoots of new growth are glowing in the garden. So too are the birds abundant in May, with a veritable cacophony welcoming the dawn of a bright day.

Bulbs are just going over with the last few of our tulips bowing out. This year’s success has been Tulipa ‘World of Friendship’ not only remaining proud in the garden for weeks but also holding itself well in a vase. The flower is a joyful, cheery, primrose yellow single tulip standing around 50cm tall. We ordinarily try to avoid yellow coloured flowers which is almost unforgivable at this time of year but T. ‘World of Friendship’ is the perfect vehicle by which to extend the ‘primrose’ toned season. I should also mention at this stage the wonderful Tree Paeony, Paeonia ‘Anna Marie’ which is just cautiously unfurling her tender petals in the Walled Garden.

Tulipa ‘World of Friendship’

The gardens are beginning to brim with colour and just as we teeter on the edge of floral splendour in the form of Paeonia I am reminded that this season has really  gone to pot. We’ve had such an extended period of fine weather you forget that we are only into the fifth month and while I impatiently wait to put out our summer bedding plants I have to bear in mind that old phrase; ‘Ne’er cast a cloot, til the month of May is oot’.

SGS Fife Trail 2019 – Visit Teasses

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Scotland’s Garden Scheme Fife  Spring Trail 2019 kicks of next week, running from 16th April to the 3rd of May. The Trail is the prefect opportunity to visit seven privately owned gardens in the county, each abundant in spring blooms. Don’t miss the chance to visit Teasses on each Friday of the the Trail, that is 19th & 26th April and 3rd May. Entry to individual gardens is £5 or buy a Trail ticket from SGS.

We look forward to seeing you at Teasses, make sure to have plenty of spool left in your camera!

Spring Blooms in the Woodland Gardens

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Spring is blooming in the gardens at Teasses and no where is more colourful than the Millennium Woodlands. The gardens are filling with the sweet scents of Primula vulgaris and Narcissus ‘Jack Snipe’.

Spring is a great time to visit the gardens at Teasses and with Scotland’s Garden Scheme Fife Spring Trail kicking off in two weeks, there is plenty to enjoy Teasses.

SGS Fife Trail 2019

By | Garden

Now that we are thoroughly embedded in the cold chill of winter, it is the ideal time to look ahead to the bright, vibrant days of spring. The Scotland’s Garden Scheme Fife Trail kicks off on the 16th April and gives you the opportunity to visit six unique gardens each with its own particular springtime highlight.

Find out more about SGS Fife Trail 2019 and where to buy tickets on the Scotland’s Garden Scheme website by clicking on the link below.

Autumn is beating at the door

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Leaves on trees are slowly turning from the vibrant fresh greens of summer to indulgent amber, scarlet and gold. Berries on bushes in the hedgerows are bountiful and glistening in the early morning dew. Industrious red squirrels are darting around the garden gathering seeds and nuts and any form of insulation they can find to keep the winter weather out of their dreys. Without a doubt the season is turning from summer; autumn is beating at the door. The first named storm of the season is upon us and has left its mark on the garden. Several trees have been blown over or snapped in half, large limbs have fallen from old oaks and beach trees. We’ve spent two days clearing up.

Teasses, Millennium Wood, Storm Ali

As our gardening predecessors once would have done; we have taken to preserving as much of the garden produce that we grow in the walled garden in our newly constructed root store. The idea of the root store is to prolong access to fresh (and in our case) organic fruits and vegetables and would have originally supplied fresh fruits and root vegetables to the Mansion house throughout the year. Much of the old techniques of storing fresh fruit and vegetables have been forgotten by modern gardeners so we have to rely on the historic accounts of victorian gardeners who were adept at keeping produce for many months.

So far we’ve managed to get our potatoes lifted and stored in crates, some of the better quality apples are polished, wrapped in newspaper and are now stacked in crates. Apples which are scabby or damaged will go into our apple juice (some of which will be fermented into cider). Also stored in the Root Store are pumpkins and squashes, which after being cured in the sun will store until the spring. Carrots, Beetroot, Celeriac and Jerusalem artichokes will be stored in the Root Store in years to come.

Fleshy produce such as plums need to be eaten, frozen or used to create Plum Wine. We’ve done all three (recipe for Plum wine to follow).

We have used the old Victorian Boiler room as our Root Store so have ingeniously divided the room with a floor above the old boiler (which is still in place, but very degraded). This gives us two very useful rooms. The upper story room is the Root Store and the lower story room will be used to grow mushrooms and force rhubarb.

The harvesting of produce is something every estate gardener looks forward to, its the culmination of months of hard work. The bottling and storing is only a tiny part of the overall task; starting with digging over beds and mulching in the winter, to hand fertilising early greenhouse crops. Ultimately the thinning, feeding and nurturing of crops in the garden all works towards these few weeks in the year when you have to be focussed on gathering produce at the right time and processing it so that it is available long into the cold dark days of winter. Its really a very primal hunter-gatherer instinct you’ll find in most people and I’m yet to meet someone who doesn’t take great pleasure and joy from it.

Garden Larder – Late Summer Harvest

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It is such a privilege to walk into the Walled Garden at this time of year to gather produce you have so carefully cultivated over the previous months. Those dark cold winter days of sowing seeds and thinning stems are rewarded by the late summer with an abundance of fruits and vegetables.

I’ve already started my first batch of Plum Wine – Recipe to follow – and soon we’ll be lifting wind-fallen apples to juice for Cider.

Teasses, Walled Garden, Teasses Estate

Dahlias in the Walled Garden

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Teasses, Walled Garden, Teasses Estate

Dahlia ‘Belle of Barmera’

Teasses, Walled Garden, Teasses Estate

Dahlia ‘Zorro’

Teasses, Walled Garden, Dahlia, Teasses Estate

The Walled Garden provides the ideal climate for these stunning Dahlias. We like to try different varieties each year, and once again we’ve been bowled over by the intensity of colour in each of the varieties we’ve selected. Here Belle of Barmera is stunning, but the star of the show has to be Dahlia ‘Zorro’ with large vibrant blooms.

Teasses, Walled Garden, Dahlia, Teasses Estate